Stuff You Like

This Tumblr is... Stuff I Like. So right now there's Harry Potter, Doctor Who, Frozen, Sherlock, and terrible puns.

There will always be terrible puns.

Anonymous asked: Did you ever find out how many puppet followers you have?

Well…yes, but I don’t want to out our puppet overlords without their consent. That’d be mean.

"…Obi-Wan, you’re sure there isn’t anything of value left on board?" “A few containers of supplies, the Queen’s wardrobe, maybe.”

Obi-Wan, provider of the single best line in the movie.

Those are some great outfits though.

(Source: breakanyballerinasheart)

I actually quite like a lot of this scene. Mostly the bits where Padme gets things done, admittedly.

(Source: skywlker)

Since her death in 1979, the woman who discovered what the universe is made of has not so much as received a memorial plaque. Her newspaper obituaries do not mention her greatest discovery. […] Every high school student knows that Isaac Newton discovered gravity, that Charles Darwin discovered evolution, and that Albert Einstein discovered the relativity of time. But when it comes to the composition of our universe, the textbooks simply say that the most abundant atom in the universe is hydrogen. And no one ever wonders how we know.

Jeremy Knowles, discussing the complete lack of recognition Cecilia Payne gets, even today, for her revolutionary discovery. (via alliterate)

OH WAIT LEMME TELL YOU ABOUT CECILIA PAYNE.

Cecilia Payne’s mother refused to spend money on her college education, so she won a scholarship to Cambridge.

Cecilia Payne completed her studies, but Cambridge wouldn’t give her a degree because she was a woman, so she said fuck that and moved to the United States to work at Harvard.

Cecilia Payne was the first person ever to earn a Ph.D. in astronomy from Radcliffe College, with what Otto Strauve called “the most brilliant Ph.D. thesis ever written in astronomy.”

Not only did Cecilia Payne discover what the universe is made of, she also discovered what the sun is made of (Henry Norris Russell, a fellow astronomer, is usually given credit for discovering that the sun’s composition is different from the Earth’s, but he came to his conclusions four years later than Payne—after telling her not to publish).

Cecilia Payne is the reason we know basically anything about variable stars (stars whose brightness as seen from earth fluctuates). Literally every other study on variable stars is based on her work.

Cecilia Payne was the first woman to be promoted to full professor from within Harvard, and is often credited with breaking the glass ceiling for women in the Harvard science department and in astronomy, as well as inspiring entire generations of women to take up science.

Cecilia Payne is awesome and everyone should know her.

(via bansheewhale)

(via womeninspace)

pkpow:

the4freedoms:

So a few days ago, I made a reference about iharthdarth to a friend of mine who’s a really big Star Wars fan. Much to my consternation, he admitted he’d never heard of it. And when I went to go complain about it to somebody else, they revealed they had never read it either! Thus, heartbroken, I turned to tumblr to rectify the situation. The comics above are just a few of my favorites.

You can read the first one here. Go. Go now. What are you waiting for. 

I harth darth was a defining piece of my literary education

(via carriefishers)

johnskylar:

gh0stcity:

gh0stcity:

There’s an abundance of bad things happening right now, and it’s hard not to be sucked into that black hole of sadness, so let’s have a puppy party shall we.

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Because, let’s face it, dogs never grow up.

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ADDED BONUS, PUPS IN MOTION!!!

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I didn’t realize how much I needed to see this until it was in front of my face.

blogbmb:

Princess Leia evolution (Jeff Victor)

blogbmb:

Princess Leia evolution (Jeff Victor)

fursasaida:

greencarnations:

ineffably-crowley:

sparkafterdark:

glumshoe:

sparkafterdark:

tenaflyviper:

He is, however, perfectly willing to fuck with time and reality.
And also steal your infants.

He didn’t steal anything. She literally asked him to take the baby. Don’t make him the bad guy just because she was a shitty sister.

I think you are severely misinformed as to how baby ownership works.
It was not her baby to give.
David Bowie is unquestionably the villain.

Which do you think existed first, modern custody legislature, or the goblin king? 
The girl was entrusted by her parents with the care and custody of the child. By the laws governing the goblin king and his transactions, the girl was the current rightful owner of the child and made a deal with the king to take the child. Perhaps you’re not familiar with english folklore. Fae have rules, they’re tricksters, they can be sneaky, but they never break the rules.

Slammin’ it down in the Labyrinth fandom tonight, kids.

look it my kitty

…the whole point of the movie is that Sarah is her own villain, for crying out loud. The villains are all inside her, whether they’re her parents or specifically her stepmother or her brother for being inconvenient or Jareth. That’s why it’s a coming of age story. Her quest, her growing up, is about seeing others for who they are—whole, real people, with real reasons for what they do—and not obstacles or nuisances or interruptions. Coming to value the world around her as much as her interior one. (Which does NOT mean giving up her interior world—that’s why it ends with the “should you need us” scene.) Her whole arc with Hoggle is basically a fable-ized version of that exact coming to terms.
Also all of the above stated is true re: Jareth and fairies and rules, of course. But the key with Jareth, as it usually is with fairies, is consent. He can’t do anything she doesn’t agree to, though he can make navigating that consent very tricky. Which is the other half of the above realization, of course—in order to see people as people and not as villains, Sarah has to realize that she has power over herself, her actions, her choices, her perceptions. This moment of her growing that little bit up is a transitional moment, which is why the entire episode is catalyzed by fairies, but fairy tales are very rarely really about the fairies. They’re about the results thereof.
(psst blackhorseandthecherrytree)

fursasaida:

greencarnations:

ineffably-crowley:

sparkafterdark:

glumshoe:

sparkafterdark:

tenaflyviper:

He is, however, perfectly willing to fuck with time and reality.

And also steal your infants.

He didn’t steal anything. She literally asked him to take the baby. Don’t make him the bad guy just because she was a shitty sister.

I think you are severely misinformed as to how baby ownership works.

It was not her baby to give.

David Bowie is unquestionably the villain.

Which do you think existed first, modern custody legislature, or the goblin king? 

The girl was entrusted by her parents with the care and custody of the child. By the laws governing the goblin king and his transactions, the girl was the current rightful owner of the child and made a deal with the king to take the child. Perhaps you’re not familiar with english folklore. Fae have rules, they’re tricksters, they can be sneaky, but they never break the rules.

Slammin’ it down in the Labyrinth fandom tonight, kids.

look it my kitty

…the whole point of the movie is that Sarah is her own villain, for crying out loud. The villains are all inside her, whether they’re her parents or specifically her stepmother or her brother for being inconvenient or Jareth. That’s why it’s a coming of age story. Her quest, her growing up, is about seeing others for who they are—whole, real people, with real reasons for what they do—and not obstacles or nuisances or interruptions. Coming to value the world around her as much as her interior one. (Which does NOT mean giving up her interior world—that’s why it ends with the “should you need us” scene.) Her whole arc with Hoggle is basically a fable-ized version of that exact coming to terms.

Also all of the above stated is true re: Jareth and fairies and rules, of course. But the key with Jareth, as it usually is with fairies, is consent. He can’t do anything she doesn’t agree to, though he can make navigating that consent very tricky. Which is the other half of the above realization, of course—in order to see people as people and not as villains, Sarah has to realize that she has power over herself, her actions, her choices, her perceptions. This moment of her growing that little bit up is a transitional moment, which is why the entire episode is catalyzed by fairies, but fairy tales are very rarely really about the fairies. They’re about the results thereof.

(psst blackhorseandthecherrytree)

(Source: , via gaslightgallows)